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The GOP must die. The Grand Old Party is over and unsalvageable. The name finds its origin in the post-Civil War era as the party that saved the Union, but whatever positive connotations may have come with the GOP moniker are dead and gone now. Today, GOP conjures images of gray hairs at the country club and board meetings at Halliburton, and it seems the only thing it is interested in saving is the status quo. There was a time when these perceptions could be dismissed as partisan pejoratives, but at some point, Republican Party leadership chose to embrace and embody the characterization. Fool me twice, shame on me. As of late, GOP legacies like Paul Ryan and Liz Cheney have decided that they will draw a line in the sand and say “you’re either with us or against us.” Denouncing the effective but unpolished populism of Donald Trump, they paint the future of the Republican Party as bleak should it continue down this path of uncouth but wildly successful policy. The answer, of course, is a resounding “bye Felicia!” Believing themselves the arbiters of conservatism, they have determined that populism has no place in the Republican Party.

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