Weaker penis bones in river otters linked to oilsands contaminants in new study

DM

A new study has found that hydrocarbon contaminants typically associated with oilsands operations are contributing to decreased penis bone strength among river otters. That might sound like a quirky bit of science clickbait — but the study’s primary author warns that his findings could have broader consequences for wildlife and human health in the oilsands region in northern Alberta. “We’ve demonstrated how the bone health measure, the penis bone, is tied to exposure to certain trace elements and to hydrocarbons,” said Philippe Thomas, a wildlife toxicologist with Environment and Climate Change Canada.

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